Category Archives: Web 2.0

When Open Source Software Makes a Political Statement

An interesting case of an OS drop down widget that made a very political statement. And not one that the web site operator shared (from Instapundit). The social networking angle in this story is also fascinating.

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Fear of the Web (2.0)

There is this interesting article about the growing security problems with social sites such as Facebook and MySpace. I predict that this will result in these sites getting added to companies blocked list.

 That won’t help of course. There are too many users that VPN into corporate intranets. They will simply browse these sites when traveling or at home, and then VPN into their corporate intranet, bringing the nasty things they picked up with them.

Haven’t we been here aready?

Jeff the Bard on Self-Issued Cards

Never read your child Dr. Seuss and then stay up late writing about Information Cards. You might have a nightmare that goes something like this (with apologies to Theodor Seuss Geisel)

Bard is Jeff
Bard is Jeff
Jeff is Bard

That Jeff-the-Bard!
That Jeff-the-Bard!
I do not like
that Jeff-the-Bard!

Do you like
self-issued cards?

I do not like them,
Jeff-the-Bard.
I do not like
self-issued cards.

Would you like them
here or there?

I would not like them
here or there.
I would not like them
anywhere.
I do not like
self-issued cards.
I do not like them,
Jeff-the-Bard.

Would you use them
in your house?
Would you use them
with your mouse?

I do not like them
in my house.
I do not like them
with my mouse.
I do not like them
here or there.
I do not like them
anywhere.
I do not like self-issued cards.
I do not like them, Jeff-the-Bard.

Would you use them
‘cause of SOX?
Would you use them
with Firefox?

Not ‘cause of SOX.
Not with Firefox.
Not in my house.
Not with my mouse.
I would not use them here or there.
I would not use them anywhere.
I would not use self-issued cards.
I do not like them, Jeff-the-Bard.

Would you? Could you?
At a bank?
Use them! Use them!
I’ll be frank!

I would not,
could not,
at a bank.

You may like them.
I’ve been shown.
You may like them
on a phone!

I would not, could not on a phone.
Not at a bank! You leave me alone.

I do not like them ‘cause of SOX.
I do not like them with Firefox.
I do not like them in my house.
I do not like them with my mouse.
I do not like them here or there.
I do not like them anywhere.
I do not like self-issued cards.
I do not like them, Jeff-the-Bard.

A blog! A blog!
A blog! A blog!
Could you, would you,
on a blog?

Not on a blog! Not on a phone!
Not at a bank! Jeff! Leave me alone!

I would not, could not, ‘cause of SOX.
I could not, would not, with Firefox.
I will not use them with my mouse.
I will not use them in my house.
I will not use them here or there.
I will not use them anywhere.
I do not use self-issued cards.
I do not like them, Jeff-the-Bard.

Say!
With Explorer?
There in Explorer!
Would you, could you, with Explorer?

I would not, could not,
with Explorer.

Would you, could you, with Safari?

I would not, could not,
with Safari.
Not with Explorer. Not with Safari.
Not at a bank. Not on a phone.
I do not like them, Sam, you’ve known.
Not in my house. Not ‘cause of SOX.
Not with my mouse. Not with Firefox.
I will not use them here or there.
I do not like them anywhere!

You do not like
self-issued cards?

I do not
like them,
Jeff-the-Bard.

Could you, would you,
with OpenID?

I would not,
could not,
with OpenID!

Would you, could you,
in Liberty?

I could not, would not, in Liberty.
I will not, will not, with OpenID.
I will not use them richer or poorer.
I will not use them with Explorer.
Not with Explorer! Not on a phone!
Not at a bank! You leave me alone!
I do not like them ‘cause of SOX.
I do not like them with Firefox.
I will not use them in my house.
I do not like them with my mouse.
I do not like them here or there.
I do not like them ANYWHERE!

I do not like
self-issued cards!
I do not like them,
Jeff-the-Bard.

You do not like them.
So you say.
Try them! Try them!
And you may.
Try them and you may, I say.

Jeff!
If you will let me be,
I will try them.
You will see.

Say!
I like self-issued cards!
I do! I like them, Jeff-the-Bard!
And I would use them in Liberty.
And I would use them with OpenID…

And I will use them as I log.
In with Explorer. And on a Blog.
And at a bank. And on a phone.
They are so good, so good, you’ve know!

So I will use them ‘cause of SOX.
And I will use them with Firefox.
And I will use them in my house.
And I will use them with my mouse.
And I will use them here and there.
Say! I will use them ANYWHERE!

I do so like
self-issued cards!
Thank you!
Thank you,
Jeff-the-Bard!

(Mirrored from TalkBMC)

Saving Local Newspapers as a Lesson for Web 2.0

There is this very interesting critique on the Yahoo! Newspaper Consortium by Terry Heaton. Most people in the tech industry don’t realize just how dire the situation is for newspapers today. While everyone realizes that newspapers are being hurt by the internet, most people don’t see the real magnitude of this because the old media general loathe shining the glaring light of openness on their own.

The article discusses the problems that local papers are facing, and they are legion:
 
Craigslist, eBay, Monster.com and other online commerce sites almost overnight yanked the lucrative profit center known as “classifieds” from the grasp of newspapers. The auto industry discovered that most people no longer use the paper to look for a car, and now the real estate industry is following suit. With big ad categories like these shrinking, newspapers’ ability to manage the bottom line through revenue is severely diminished. Layoffs and deep budget cuts have ensued, and the very existence of the modern-era keepers of the fourth estate is in jeopardy.

It then goes on to discuss the Yahoo! Newspaper Consortium. Heaton thinks that the consortium may provide short term benefit for locals but long the real benefit goes to Yahoo!:

I don’t like it, because I view Yahoo! as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Internet pureplay companies want LOCAL revenues, because that’s where revenue is growing. Local media companies used to be able to fish in the local pond with little competition, but now there are hundreds of new nets pushing us this way and that. This is the business reality that we all face, broadcast or print.

By marrying themselves to Yahoo!, consortium members are not only accepting these new revenue nets, they’re actually dipping Yahoo!’s into the pond for them and turning up the volume – with respect to Ross Perot – on the sucking sound of its draining. I don’t see how this is good business for local media companies.

Now here is the best quote of the article because it says something fundamental about the current debate going on about Web 2.0 and OpenID in particular:

We simply must accept the reality that being a part of a network isn’t as profitable as running the whole thing. Being a network node is a losing proposition these days, because we’re all networked (what I call “pixels on a page”). The only real value that can be created is to run the network and let the nodes work for you. This is what Yahoo! is doing with the newspapers.

This is exactly why there are so many more OpenID identity providers than there are relying parties.

Of course you won’t find insight this like published as an editorial in any newspaper.

(Mirrored from TalkBMC)