Monthly Archives: August 2010

It’s easier to push than be pulled

There is a lot of push vs pull provisioning discussion going on recently. Both models have a place but there is hard and fast rule you should consider. If your solution requires your customers to stand up a web service (SOAP or REST) you are going to be running uphill against a head wind. Customers see public web services as support and security costs they just don’t want to pay.

For most customers it’s far easier to have a system running in a data center that makes that makes web service requests to a provider than it is to stand up a service. Google, for one recognizes this. The Google Apps Directory Sync is often incorrectly cited as a “Pull Provisioning” technology when it is exactly the opposite. The sync software runs on the customer side, reads from the local directory and pushes to the Google Apps Provisioning Web Service.

A proper provisioning standard, regardless if it’s SOAP or REST, should support both push and pull (note that SPML supports both). But I really don’t see the pull model getting much traction for cloud based provisioning. Perhaps it will for provisioning internal applications.

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Yet another abuse by the TSA

This story about how the TSA not only searched a woman’s bags, but also went through her check book and receipts is quite infuriating (but not really surprising). The USA flying situation has already degraded into a farcical mix of incompetence and fascism that could only be surpassed by the society in Terry Gilliam’s classic “Brazil”. And I’m not sure it surpasses it by all that much.

And  we all will soon get to experience the electronic equivalent of a strip search once they roll out the new body scanners.

The worst part of all this is that the TSA’s policy seems to be that if you react with anything other than meek acceptance they will call the police. The consistent code words are “elevated behavior”.

If your behavior isn’t elevated after interacting with the TSA, there’s something wrong with you. If only we would wake up and fire the lot of them.

Forgetful Paradisio

Tim Cole has an interesting post about the need for a “forgetful” internet. A place where embarrassing pictures don’t haunt you for life. A place where there is no permanent record. A place where all sins are eventual forgiven and forgotten.

Such a place does not now exist. Unfortunately the search for such a forgetful paradisio leads instead to the inferno of government control. For if the government can tell you how long you can leave something online, they can also tell you not to put it online to begin with. And they will.