A whole lot of I don’t understand it

Newsfactor.com is running the scary headline of the day:

Social Networking Linked To ‘Infantilized Lifestyle’

The gist of the article is that social networking will make us “infantilized” or “autistic” or “something”:

In case you’ve run out of things to worry about, a British scientist has raised concerns about whether social-networking sites could be harmful to your social health. But other reports indicate new ways that social networking can expand relationships.

Oxford University neuroscientist Susan Greenfield, in a debate in the House of Lords, asked if such pastimes are changing the way brains function, shortening attention spans, and possibly even contributing to the rise of autism. Greenfield is a member of the House of Lords, where she holds the title of baroness.

I suppose pointing out that serious autism is diagnosed before age 5 would have any impact on the thinking here would be too much to hope for.

But perhaps the Baroness of Scary Headlines has a mountain of hard scientific research to back this up. Not so much:

“Perhaps given the brain is so impressionable,” Greenfield said, it’s possible that “screen life” is creating a more “infantilized lifestyle,” adding that Facebook and similar sites might create short attention spans. She acknowledged, however, that she did not possess any scientific research to back up her musings, and that it was “based on a little bit of neuroscience, observations, a bit of clinical evidence.”

Greenfield noted that “there is no one single or conclusive killer fact,” although she did report that a teacher acquaintance has noticed a decline in her students’ ability to relate to others.

In other words a little bit of pseudo science, a little bit of folklore, a pinch of something a friend told her, and a whole lot of I don’t understand this whole social networking thing.

Update – from an EA spokesman:

Electronic Arts, the major video game maker, says it has heard arguments like Ms. Greenfield’s before. “It seems like a new entertainment medium hasn’t really arrived until a scientist jumps up and says it’s making us all crazy. Balancing this are studies from equally credentialed researchers that show media like videogames actually enhance problem solving and other complex brain activity,” said spokesman Jeff Brown.

He added: “I’ll wait to read her study on her Facebook page.”

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2 responses to “A whole lot of I don’t understand it

  1. Come to London for the Gartner Identity and Access Management Summit and hear “the Baroness of Scary Headlines” deliver her keynote presentation! 23-24 March, Royal Lancaster Hotel, London. http://europe.gartner.com/iam/

    See you there‽

  2. No. Unfortunately.

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