Daily Archives: December 24, 2008

Phillips versus flat-head, for real this time

A while back I wrote this post comparing the argument between Virtual Directories and Meta-directories to an argument comparing Phillips and flat-head screw drivers. I forgot about it until I noticed something interesting. Somehow a lot of readers found there way to the post from a thread comparing Java and C#. But another group of readers found arrived by searching for, oddly enough, information about Phillips versus flat-head screws.

Now I have no more interest in getting involved in the Java versus C# language debate than I am in the Virtual Directory versus Meta-directory debate.

But Phillips versus Flat-head screws? Boy have I got some opinions on that.

If you have to work with existing screws your choice has already made for you (just as if you join a project in progress you seldom get to choose between Java and C#). But if you are starting a project from scratch, you not only have to choose between Phillips and Flat-head, there is also Torx (the commercial name for hexlobular internally driven screws), square, hex, Allen (internal hex), one-way-flat-head, spline drive, etc. Just as you might consider more choices than Phillips and flat-head, you might also consider a myriad of programming languages in addition to Java and C#.

But some are clearly superior to others in certain aspects. Flat-head screws have more driving power than Phillips head screws (Phillips head screws are designed to cam-out to prevent over tightening, an intentional design feature). But flat-head screws are much harder to drive by hand due to tool slippage. This is an interesting analogy to  the ease of development of C++ versus both Java and C#.

Allen and hex head screws have even more driving power than flat-head screws and are easier to user, but suffer from the limitation of needing have the exact size tool to fit the specific head size, whereas flat-head screws can accommodate a wide variety of tool sizes. This is similar to how scripting languages are often limited to use in a specific framework.

Wait, am I still talking about screws?

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